Troyens

Troyens

Friday, July 22, 2016

LA Phil Press Department Needs a Macro.

And so do I. Their latest press release, reproduced below, skipped the diacriticals in their Associate Conductor's name.

ASSOCIATE CONDUCTOR MIRGA GRAZINYTE-TYLA LEADS THE LA PHIL AND PIANIST JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET IN WORKS BY BEETHOVEN AND RAVEL AT THE HOLLYWOOD BOWL
 
Tuesday, July 26, 2016 at 8PM
 
Media Sponsor: KUSC
WHAT:
 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Associate Conductor Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla returns to the Hollywood Bowl to conduct a concert featuring works by Beethoven and Ravel on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 at 8PM.  The LA Phil welcomes renowned pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, sopranos Janai Brugger and Elizabeth Zharoff, mezzo-soprano Peabody Southwell, tenors Rafael Moras andKevin Ray, and bass Colin Ramsey for a performance of Beethoven's Choral Fantasy with the Los Angeles Master Chorale.  The program also includes Ravel's Daphnis and Chloé Suite No. 2 with the Master Chorale.
 
Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla was a Dudamel Fellow with the LA Phil in the 2012/13 season, became an assistant conductor in 2014 and with the start of the 2016 Hollywood Bowl season becomes Associate Conductor.  At the age of 29, she has already made meaningful relationships with top orchestras around the world and gained a reputation for mesmerizing performances.  In addition to her responsibilities as the LA Phil's Associate Conductor, Mirga is Music Director of the Salzburg Landestheater.   Most notably, Mirga has been named Music Director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra starting with the 2016 season.  In this position, Mirga follows in the footsteps of distinguished conductors Sir Simon Rattle, Sakari Oramo and Andris Nelsons. 
 
Jean-Yves Thibaudet, hailed as one of the best pianists in the world, joins the LA Phil for this performance while embracing three significant residencies this season: with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, the Seattle Symphony Orchestra, and the Colburn School in Los Angeles.  At the latter, he continues a three-year engagement where his passion for education and fostering young musical talent is invested in masterclasses and performances with the students. Thibaudet's recording catalogue of more than 50 albums has received two Grammy nominations, the Diapason d'Or, Gramophone and Echo awards and the Edison Prize. He has also made a significant impact in the worlds of film, fashion and philanthropy - performing on the award-winning film soundtracks for AtonementPride and Prejudice and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, and attired in a concert wardrobe designed by Dame Vivienne Westwood.
 
Complete program:
 
BEETHOVEN          Leonore Overture No. 3
BEETHOVEN          Choral Fantasy
RAVEL                   Mother Goose Suite
RAVEL                   Daphnis and Chloé Suite No. 2
WHEN:
 
Tuesday, July 26, 2016 at 8PM
WHO:
 
Los Angeles Philharmonic
MIRGA GRAZINYTE-TYLA, conductor
JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET, piano
JANAI BRUGGER, soprano
ELIZABETH ZHAROFF, soprano
PEABODY SOUTHWELL, mezzo-soprano
RAFAEL MORAS, tenor
KEVIN RAY, tenor
COLIN RAMSEY, bass
Los Angeles Master Chorale
Grant Gershon, artistic director

[There's obviously no way MGT will be mistaken for anyone else. I say they need a macro because I need one too: I have to look up the diacriticals in Gražinytė-Tyla every time. In fact, I'm not even sure what the diacritical over the e is. Sometimes, copy and paste is your friend.]

[I can't tell you how shocked I was to see "Ravel" and "Jean-Yes Thibaudet" and then find that Thibaudet isn't playing one of the Ravel piano concertos.]

9 comments:

kalimac said...

The diacritic is a single dot above the letter. So far as I can figure it out, that seems to indicate an "e" that's close to a short "i" in sound.

Lisa Hirsch said...

Thanks - I need to take a look at the charts of Macintosh key combos to see how to produce that. Or just continue using cut & paste.

Robert Gordon said...

I think (checking the Wikipedia article on Lithuanian phonology) that the dot over the "ė" indicates a long vowel -- one that is held longer than otherwise.

Setting aside the matter of vowel quantity (which is no longer phonemic in English), the sound must be more or less the same as the long "e" in German. The closest sound in English would be the long "a", except that sound in English is a diphthong (a consequence of the Great Vowel Shift in the 14th-15th century), whereas in German or Lithuanian it is a pure vowel.

Robert Gordon said...

Here is a clip of Mirga pronouncing her own name very carefully, although the interviewer still can't quite reproduce what she says.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqJpJUVV05c

Notice the falling tone on the first of the two Y's. Lithuanian has a pitch accent system, according to which the stressed syllable has either a rising or a falling tone on it. (The stress/pitch rules for diphthongs are too complicated for me to understand.)

kalimac said...

Certainly doesn't sound like a long vowel.

Lisa Hirsch said...

Thank you, Rob!

I've listened to the clip of MGT pronouncing her names several times, now and when she was appointed to the CBSO - Alex Ross ran it on his blog back then. I still can barely pronounce it. I find the iny combination particularly hard to get right.

Molly said...

The "iny" sequence is not that difficult. The clip on Alex Ross' website is nice, but she's a bit self-conscious and speaks over-deliberately. Orthographic "i" in Lithuanian is the vowel in "bit". "y" is the vowel in the German "Lied". The "e" with the dot on top is the IPA "e" of the first syllable of "Beethoven", but at the end of a syllable it may not seem so long. In "Mirga", the "r" is trilled. Consonants preceding front vowels (including "i" and "e" and "a" vowels) are palatalized.

As Robert mentioned, there is also pitch accent too. It might be easier to hear in this clip:

http://forvo.com/word/mirga_gra%C5%BEinyt%C4%97-tyla/

Eric G said...

Not saying this is right or wrong, but there are major publications that skip diacriticals (cough, cough, NY Times, cough)

Lisa Hirsch said...

(Cough) Yeah. (Cough)